The Swiss Family Robinson – We Relocate To The Forest Questions & Answers

Hi Everyone!! This article will share The Swiss Family Robinson – We Relocate To The Forest Questions & Answers.

The Swiss Family Robinson is a novel written by Swiss Pastor, Johan David Wyss. It aims at teaching people values like determination, self-reliance, co-operation, love for your family and prudent use of resources.  I have also shared the questions and answers of The Swiss Family Robinson – Night Fright and Return To The Wreck so, you can check these posts as well.

The Swiss Family Robinson – We Relocate To The Forest Questions & Answers

Question 1: How did the family react on the narrator and his elder sons return?

Answer: They were eagerly greeted by their family. When the first burst of happiness had subsided, they gave them an account of their endeavours on the wreck. The family expressed their surprise and joy at seeing so many useful animals. Ernest and Jack ran to the boat and expressed their admiration of the mast, the sail and the flag.

Question 2: What were Jack and Ernest admiring?

Answer: Jack and Ernest were admiring the mast, the sail and the flag on the boat.

Question 3: What did the narrator’s wife reflect on?

Answer: The narrator’s wife looked about in the hope of finding a shady place where they might retire from the heat of the sun but she found not a single tree. This made her reflect a little seriously on the fact that it would be impossible to remain in that place with no proper shelter except for the miserable tent.

Question 4: Why was the family taken aback in the woods?

Answer: The family was taken aback in the woods because what appeared to them from a distance as forest, was in reality a group of just fourteen trees, the trunks of which seemed to be held in an upright position by arches on each side.

The Swiss Family Robinson – We Relocate To The Forest Questions & Answers

Question 5: To what does the narrator’s wife compare the trees in the woods?

Answer: The narrator’s wife compares the trees with the large lime tree that was there near the park in the town that they had lived before.

Question 6: What was the first task at hand?

Answer: The first task at hand was to see if the timbers were long enough to reach the other side of the river.

Question 7: What ideas did the narrator come up with?

Answer: The narrator came up with the idea of making a storehouse with rocks to safeguard their provisions and for retreating for safety in case of danger and then building a bridge across the river which can be used to pass over with family and baggage if need be.

Question 8: How did the narrator send the timber across the river?

Answer: The narrator decided to attach one of the timbers to the tree’s trunk by a strong cord which turned freely round the trunk. He fastened a second cord to the other end of the timber, and tying a stone, flung it to the opposite bank. Then he passed the river with a pulley. Passing the second cord through the pulley and recrossing the river with this cord in hand, he planned to harness the cow and the ass to the end of the cord. Next, he drove the animals from the bank of the river. Fixing one end of the beam firmly to the trunk of the tree, and then they drew along the other end, gradually advancing over the river. It touched the other side and at length become firm and fixed by its own weight.

Question 9: Why did the narrator make a second trip back to the wreck?

Answer: The narrator made a second trip back to the wreck to bring away a sufficient quantity of planks and timber for making the bridge.

Question 10: ‘What appeared to us in distance to be a wood was in reality a group of fourteen trees’? In what context was this statement made?

Answer: When the narrator and Fritz returned to the island, the narrator’s wife shared the thought that it would be impossible to remain there without proper shelter. So, they decided to make their way into the wood across the river in search of a more suitable place to set up a camp. After travelling for quite some distance, they realized that what appeared to them as a thick dense forest from a distance was in reality only a group of just fourteen trees. The trees were tall and were supported in the upright position by arches on each side. These arches were made of the roots of the trees and the twigs of the trees were strong and thick, making it look like a dense forest. The narrator makes the above statement referring to these trees.

So, these were The Swiss Family Robinson – We Relocate To The Forest Questions & Answers.